Field Experience

Experiencing Visual Rhetoric at the Living Memorial in Marquette Park

Juniors in the Rhetoric class met with Alia Bilal from Inner-City Muslim Action Network (IMAN) at the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Living Memorial in Marquette Park. Students have been pursuing the guiding question, how do voices work to unite people, divide opinion, and transcend conflict? In the third unit of this Humanities course, students are asked to look at how rhetoric inspires and mobilizes?. The Action Project for Unit 3 asks students to create “an original artwork” that “speak[s] out on issues that receive little attention” and “inspires collective action.” In order to contextualize such a statement and experience it in person, we journeyed to Marquette Park to see the monument there to Dr. Martin Luther King’s protest march in 1966, known as the Living Memorial.

Field Experience

The Design Process @ Beyond Design

Juniors in the Design & Engineering class met with Michael Prince, the president of Beyond Design. In this STEAM course, students are investigating what it means to be a designer. Through this investigation, students have learned that being a designer is far more than conceptualizing and designing a new product. Being a designer requires empathy, compassion, patience, expertise, and a whole lot more. This was confirmed by our visit with Mr. Prince. He shared stories about the trials and tribulations of starting his own design firm. He stressed the importance of empathizing with his clients, working with a diverse team, and embracing the iterative nature of the design process.

It was a unique and eye-opening experience to get a behind-the-scenes look at a successful design firm.

Why?

This term we are studying design, and how to make things better. The purpose of this FE is to introduce the class to professional designers and to get them to think like designers.

How? 

Students talked to designer Michael Prince and toured Beyond Design to understand the work of a designer.

Field Experience

Forced From Home in Daley Plaza

The Sophomore Stories class and Senior Journalism class visited Forced From Home, an interactive exhibition presented by Doctors Without Borders to educate the public about the refugee crisis. GCE students engaged with stories and materials gathered from refugee camps, sea rescue missions, and emergency medical projects around the world to get closer to the real experiences of people displaced by violence and extreme hardship worldwide.

Why?

Students in Stories and Journalism are investigating how to effectively communicate through storytelling. Students were guided through the exhibit by experienced Doctors Without Borders aids who have seen firsthand the impact of the refugee crisis. The tour guides and components of the exhibit are tasked with sharing the experiences of the refugees in an impactful and responsible way. The students’ experience through this immersive exhibit gave them insight into the elements of effective and responsible storytelling.

How?

In preparation, students learned about the exhibit and its aim to address SDGs 10, 11, and 16.

Field Experience

Examining Our Truth @ Poetry Foundation

Students in the Poetic Justice course visited the Poetry Foundation to investigate the guiding question, “What story is yours to tell?”. In the first unit of this Humanities Elective course, students have been studying, analyzing, and critiquing political poetry from a range of poets discussing local and global issues. In addition to looking at the poets’ political message, the students have also been examining their utilization of poetic devices to help get their message across.

With a draft of their own political poem in hand, they headed to the Poetry Foundation where Amy Lipman led them through an exercise that challenged them to re-examine their own writing. Amy led the students in an examination of documentary poetry and poetry of witness and they were posed with the question, “Is the story you are telling, yours to tell?”. The students dissected different styles of writing and took some time to re-read and revise their own poems.

Field Experience

Machines vs Humans @ mHUB

Students in the Rapid Prototyping course visited mHUB to investigate the vast possibilities of rapid prototyping. mHUB is Chicago’s innovation center for physical product development and manufacturing. The students have been investigating the guiding question, What can machines do that hands can’t?. In the first unit of this course, students have been investigating the line, and concepts such as, networks, slopes, intercepts, and angles as the foundation for all things that are built. At mHUB, our host, Bria showed us around the impressive facility and explained the uses of different spaces, tools, and machines. During our tour, we met engineers who talked in-depth about different types of machines, we met designers working on prototypes for products getting ready to launch, and we met artists creating their masterpieces. It was an eye-opening experience to see the possibilities and essentially, the necessity of rapid prototyping in the 21st century.

Field Experience

Design with Empathy @ Working Bikes

Juniors in the Design & Engineering class talked to bike expert, Andrew at Working Bikes in Pilsen to learn about the mechanics of bikes and the purposes that different types of bikes serve. In the second unit of this STEAM course, students have been pursuing the guiding question, how are bikes designed and engineered to solve specific problems?. In their pursuit of an answer, students have been studying the concepts of weight, speed, acceleration, velocity, and mass and their effects on simple machines such as the wheel, the axle, and the pulley. To gain a better understanding, the students visited Working Bikes where they prepped bikes to be transported. Working Bikes gives new life to discarded bicycles and distributes them as tools of empowerment to local and global communities.

On the day the students visited, a shipping crate was waiting to be filled and shipped to the Kingdom of Lesotho in Africa. Andrew, the volunteer coordinator at Working Bikes showed the group how to prep the bikes and they got right to work. The experience was informative and extermely humbling.

Why?

The purpose of this Field Experience is to investigate the guiding question, how do bicycles impact lives?. The students talked to experts to investigate the evolution of bikes and how they are put together so that they can then design a bike that suits a person’s specific needs.

How?

The students talked to bike shop employees about the parts that make up a bike, their purpose, and the choices designers make when choosing to use certain parts over others.

Field Experience

Assessing Risk @ Capital One Café

Seniors in the Economics class met with a financial consultant at the Capital One Café. In this STEAM course, students are pursuing the guiding question, how do we make choices in a world of limited resources and limited time?. In the first unit of this course, students have been analyzing the value of risks, taking into consideration time, cost, and utility. As a part of this first unit, students have also been calculating and assessing the value of college. The experts at Capital One Café stressed the importance of short- and long-term goal-setting, saving for emergencies, and finding happiness and balance in all of it.

Why?

The purpose of this Field Experience is to investigate the guiding question, how do you determine value?.

How?

The students will talk with a financial consultant at Capital One Café to learn more about value, utility, and risk.

Field Experience

Rhetoric of Revolt @ The Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Living Memorial

Juniors in the Rhetoric class met with Alia Bilal from Inner-City Muslim Action Network (IMAN) at the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Living Memorial in Marquette Park. Students have been pursuing the guiding question, how do voices work to unite people, divide opinion, and transcend conflict? In the third unit of this Humanities course, students are asked to look at how rhetoric inspires and mobilizes?. The Action Project for Unit 3 asks students to create “an original artwork” that “speak[s] out on issues that receive little attention” and “inspires collective action.” In order to contextualize such a statement and experience it in person, we journeyed to Marquette Park to see the monument there to Dr. Martin Luther King’s protest march in 1966, known as the Living Memorial.

Why?

The purpose of this Field Experience is to investigate the guiding question, how does rhetoric inspire and unite?.

How?

The students learned about both the history that led to the Chicago Freedom Movement’s protest march and the movement to preserve the memory of that action with the Living Monument.