The True Cost of College

For the first Action Project in Economics, GCE Seniors investigated the following guiding question:

How do you determine the value of your college education?

Here’s the scenario students were challenged with:

You are a high school senior and you are deciding whether to go to college, enroll in community college, or seek an internship next Fall. You are financing the entire cost of your education to pursue the career of your choice. You have heard that college has never been more expensive to attend. Between 2000 and 2010, the average cost of attending a private, 4-year institution has increased over 35%. However, your parents might think it’s worth it. The US Census Bureau data seems to agree, publishing a study that suggests college grads earn 74% more than those with a just a high school diploma. From your Economics class, you learned that over a lifetime that difference can mean more than a million dollar in forgone income.

Your peers, family, teachers, and school administrators are excited to hear what you decide to do next year and why. In a 60 second video, explain your decision for next year and explanation. Your video is an executive summary. It must be accompanied by an in-depth analysis of your decision-making. Acceptable formats are 2-3 page paper or 5-15 slide power-point presentation.

Click on the eyechart to take a closer look at the featured student works.

National Standards: Project Alignment with Common Core Math & NextGen Standards

CED.A.1 Create equations and inequalities in one variable and use them to solve problems. Include equations arising from linear and quadratic functions, and simple rational and exponential functions.

CED.A.2: Create equations in two or more variables to represent relationships between quantities; graph equations on coordinate axes with labels and scales.

REI.C.6: Solve systems of linear equations exactly and approximately (e.g., with graphs), focusing on pairs of linear equations in two variables.

ID.C.7: Interpret the slope (rate of change) and the intercept (constant term) of a linear model in the context of the data.

The Meaning of Life

For the first Action Project in Journalism, GCE Seniors investigated the following guiding question:

What’s the meaning of life… in 1000 words & 1 photo?

Here’s the scenario students were challenged with:

Right before the Holidays, in December 1988, LIFE Magazine published a special edition called “The Meaning of Life”; the editors asked “scientists and theologians, authors and artists, celebrities and everyday sages on the street” about their views on the meaning of life. They also invited “seven photographers who captured the meaning of life on a single frame of film”. These quotes are from the magazine.

Now, in a new century, LIFE Magazine decided to recycle the project “The Meaning of Life — in 1000 words & 1 photo”. LIFE invited High School Senior students from all over the world to take on the role of a journalist to interview and photograph someone they believe to have an interesting/important/unique view of the meaning of life. The participants need to submit a single photo, together with a 1000 words-max text. The best submissions will be shared with the world on the LIFE legendary magazine.

Please click on the photos in the gallery exhibit to open the featured student work.

Alignment with Common Core ELA Standards

ON RESEARCH & INTERVIEWING:

SL.11-12.7. Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self- generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

SL.11-12.1c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.

ON MULTI-MEDIA (Photo-analysis):

RH.11-12.7. Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.


WHST.11-12.0. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

WHST.11-12.2. Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.

  1. Introduce a topic and organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  2. Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.
  3. Use varied transitions and sentence structures to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.
  4. Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic; convey a knowledgeable stance in a style that responds to the discipline and context as well as to the expertise of likely readers.
  5. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation provided (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

The True Cost of College

For the first Action Project in Economics, GCE Seniors investigated the following guiding question:

How do you determine the value of your college education?

Here’s the scenario students were challenged with:

You are a high school senior and you are deciding whether to go to college, enroll in community college, or seek an internship next Fall. You are financing the entire cost of your education to pursue the career of your choice. You have heard that college has never been more expensive to attend. Between 2000 and 2010, the average cost of attending a private, 4-year institution has increased over 35%. However, your parents might think it’s worth it. The US Census Bureau data seems to agree, publishing a study that suggests college grads earn 74% more than those with a just a high school diploma. From your Economics class, you learned that over a lifetime that difference can mean more than a million dollar in forgone income.

Your peers, family, teachers, and school administrators are excited to hear what you decide to do next year and why. In a 60 second video, explain your decision for next year and explanation. Your video is an executive summary. It must be accompanied by an in-depth analysis of your decision-making. Acceptable formats are 2-3 page paper or 5-15 slide power-point presentation.

Click on the different career cards to take a closer look at the featured student works.

National Standards: Project Alignment with Common Core Math & NextGen Standards

CED.A.1 Create equations and inequalities in one variable and use them to solve problems. Include equations arising from linear and quadratic functions, and simple rational and exponential functions.

CED.A.2: Create equations in two or more variables to represent relationships between quantities; graph equations on coordinate axes with labels and scales.

REI.C.6: Solve systems of linear equations exactly and approximately (e.g., with graphs), focusing on pairs of linear equations in two variables.

ID.C.7: Interpret the slope (rate of change) and the intercept (constant term) of a linear model in the context of the data.

The Economics of College

For the first Economics Action Project, GCE Senior students investigated the following guiding question:

How do you determine the value of your college education?

Here’s the scenario students were challenged with:

You are a high school senior and you are deciding whether to go to college, enroll in community college, or seek an internship next Fall. You are financing the entire cost of your education to pursue the career of your choice. You have heard that college has never been more expensive to attend. Between 2000 and 2010, the average cost of attending a private, 4-year institution has increased over 35%. However, your parents might think it’s worth it. The US Census Bureau data seems to agree, publishing a study that suggests college grads earn 74% more than those with a just a high school diploma. From your Economics class, you learned that over a lifetime that difference can mean more than a million dollar in forgone income.

Your peers, family, teachers, and school administrators are excited to hear what you decide to do next year and why. In a 60 second video, explain your decision for next year and explanation. Your video is an executive summary. It must be accompanied by an in-depth analysis of your decision-making. Acceptable formats are 2-3 page paper or 5-15 slide power-point presentation.

Click on the piggy banks to take a closer look at the featured student works.

National Standards: Project Alignment with Common Core Math & NextGen Standards

CED.A.1 Create equations and inequalities in one variable and use them to solve problems. Include equations arising from linear and quadratic functions, and simple rational and exponential functions.

CED.A.2: Create equations in two or more variables to represent relationships between quantities; graph equations on coordinate axes with labels and scales.

REI.C.6: Solve systems of linear equations exactly and approximately (e.g., with graphs), focusing on pairs of linear equations in two variables.

ID.C.7: Interpret the slope (rate of change) and the intercept (constant term) of a linear model in the context of the data.

The Meanings of Life

For the first Journalism Action Project, GCE Seniors investigated the following guiding question:

What’s the meaning of life… in 1000 words & 1 photo?

Here’s the scenario students were challenged with:

Right before the Holidays, in December 1988, LIFE Magazine published a special edition called “The Meaning of Life”; the editors asked “scientists and theologians, authors and artists, celebrities and everyday sages on the street” about their views on the meaning of life. They also invited “seven photographers who captured the meaning of life on a single frame of film”. These quotes are from the magazine.

Now, in a new century, LIFE Magazine decided to recycle the project “The Meaning of Life — in 1000 words & 1 photo”. LIFE invited High School Senior students from all over the world to take on the role of a journalist to interview and photograph someone they believe to have an interesting/important/unique view of the meaning of life. The participants need to submit a single photo, together with a 1000 words-max text. The best submissions will be shared with the world on the LIFE legendary magazine.

Please click on the images in the magazine spread to open the featured student work.

Alignment with Common Core ELA Standards

ON RESEARCH & INTERVIEWING:

SL.11-12.7. Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self- generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

SL.11-12.1c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.

ON MULTI-MEDIA (Photo-analysis):

RH.11-12.7. Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.


WHST.11-12.0. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

WHST.11-12.2. Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.

  1. Introduce a topic and organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  2. Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.
  3. Use varied transitions and sentence structures to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.
  4. Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic; convey a knowledgeable stance in a style that responds to the discipline and context as well as to the expertise of likely readers.
  5. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation provided (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).
Systems & Models: An integrated, project-based high school class

Systems & Models

To what extent are you unique as an individual, and how do you function within the larger framework of an organization such as your school, place of worship, or job? In Systems and Models, you will explore breakthroughs in psychology; you will use the scientific method to design and carry out your own experiment; and ideally, you will conclude the course knowing how to be of greater value to yourself and others.

Entrepreneurship: An integrated, project-based high school class

Social Entrepreneurship

Prerequisite understanding of economics and systems thinking serves as the foundation to envision and plan a business venture which you may passionately and realistically pursue. Fueling your inspiration are weekly workshops with successful entrepreneurs. The course guides you through core concepts of entrepreneurship, and then demands that you write and pitch your own business plan.

Economics: An integrated, project-based high school class

Econ: Risking Value

We live in a world of limited resources, but our wants and needs are unlimited. Amid scarcity, choices are made. In this course, you will explore the value of a college education and plan your financial future using principles of economics and personal finance, statistics, and probability. You will read case studies and visit financial institutions to learn how economists apply models to solve real-world problems from the financial crisis to poverty reduction.