For the Ollywood Elective Course, GCE students investigated the following guiding question:

How can you critique the elements of film post-production?

Here’s the scenario students were challenged with:

“National Public Radio is hosting a competition for high school students to record a podcast analysis of a movie. The winning podcasts will be featured on the critcally acclaimed show, Fresh Air. David Edelstein, the film critic for Fresh Air requires the podcasts to analyze the film for elements of post-production, including editing, film score, and use of special effects.  Edelstein also requires the film to be analyzed through one of the following approaches: Marxist, feminist, generic, auterist, psychological, dualist, genetic, or realist. The winning podcasts will be chosen based on the quality of audio, ease of speech, and of course, knowledge of the elements of post-production. Good Luck!   

Click on the tracks in the playlist to listen to the students’ podcasts.

National Standards: Project Alignment with Common Core Standards:

Text Types and Purposes:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.1.B. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.1.D.Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.1.E.Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.3.B. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.3.C. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.3.D. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.3.E. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

Comprehension and Collaboration:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.1.A. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.

Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.4. Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.5 Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.


Ollywood

What makes a movie a movie? How is storytelling through film different from storytelling through literature? Which films deserve a “thumbs-up” and which deserve a “thumbs-down” – and why? These are just some of the questions you will pursue in the Olly …


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