For the Journalism Course, GCE Seniors investigated the guiding question:

How do you write on the spot, with 500-700 words?

Students were faced with the scenario:

The GCE Herald, the student-led school newspaper is running a series of articles that feature news from the different neighborhoods represnted at GCE. Concerned with maintaining authenticty, the editors of the GCE Herald is putting out a call for submissions. They’re asking students to think and act as journalists to write a spot story about an event that took place in your neighborhood. The spot story must be between 500-700 words and must follow the outline of the inverted pyramid of journalism.

Click on the notes and photos on the jounralist’s desk to see the students’ work.

Alignment with Common Core ELA Standards

 
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.11-12.2.A
Introduce a topic and organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.11-12.2.B
Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.11-12.2.C
Use varied transitions and sentence structures to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.11-12.2.E
Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation provided (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

W.5.5 With guidance and support from adults and peers, focus on a topic and strengthen writing as needed by revising and editing.

L.6.2a. Use punctuation (commas, parentheses, dashes) to set off nonrestrictive/parenthetical elements.

L.6.3a. Vary sentence patterns for meaning, reader/listener interest, and style.

L.7.3a. Choose language that expresses ideas precisely and concisely, recognizing and eliminating wordiness and redundancy.

L.8.1d. Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb voice and mood.

WHST.11-12.0. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

WHST.11-12.2. Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.

a. Introduce a topic and organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. 

b. Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic. 

c. Use varied transitions and sentence structures to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts. 

d. Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic; convey a knowledgeable stance in a style that responds to the discipline and context as well as to the expertise of likely readers. 

e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation provided (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).


Sacrificing Safety for Profit  by MN 11-Year-Old Boy Victim of Hit-and-Run Near His Home by VD A School Shooting in North Suburbs by SC GCE News by CG


Journalism

How do you know about the world? In this course, you will learn how to observe, analyze and report on current events through different media—Image, Sound and Text. In each of these three units, you will be challenged to conduct an exploration into a re …


Learn more about our Journalism Course