The True Cost of College

For the first Action Project in Economics, GCE Seniors investigated the following guiding question:

How do you determine the value of your college education?

Here’s the scenario students were challenged with:

You are a high school senior and you are deciding whether to go to college, enroll in community college, or seek an internship next Fall. You are financing the entire cost of your education to pursue the career of your choice. You have heard that college has never been more expensive to attend. Between 2000 and 2010, the average cost of attending a private, 4-year institution has increased over 35%. However, your parents might think it’s worth it. The US Census Bureau data seems to agree, publishing a study that suggests college grads earn 74% more than those with a just a high school diploma. From your Economics class, you learned that over a lifetime that difference can mean more than a million dollar in forgone income.

Your peers, family, teachers, and school administrators are excited to hear what you decide to do next year and why. In a 60 second video, explain your decision for next year and explanation. Your video is an executive summary. It must be accompanied by an in-depth analysis of your decision-making. Acceptable formats are 2-3 page paper or 5-15 slide power-point presentation.

Click on the eyechart to take a closer look at the featured student works.

National Standards: Project Alignment with Common Core Math & NextGen Standards

CED.A.1 Create equations and inequalities in one variable and use them to solve problems. Include equations arising from linear and quadratic functions, and simple rational and exponential functions.

CED.A.2: Create equations in two or more variables to represent relationships between quantities; graph equations on coordinate axes with labels and scales.

REI.C.6: Solve systems of linear equations exactly and approximately (e.g., with graphs), focusing on pairs of linear equations in two variables.

ID.C.7: Interpret the slope (rate of change) and the intercept (constant term) of a linear model in the context of the data.

Voices of the Century

For the Journalism Course, GCE Seniors investigated the guiding question:

What’s the story of a voice, in 3-5 minutes?

Students were faced with the scenario:

WBEZ started an online Museum of Voices that mark the 21st century. The WBEZ producers put out a call for 3-5 minute podcasts that creatively tell how a specific voice of this century is impacting the lives of people. The voices may be of musicians, politicians, radio-personalities, etc, as long as they represent some aspect of the 21st century.

The podcasts focus on the following ideas:

  • a mini-biography of this voice
  • an interview with this voice (if possible)
  • a story of a person or people impacted by this voice
  • Click on the portraits to see the students’ work.

    Alignment with Common Core ELA Standards

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.7
    Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.11-12.1.B
    Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant data and evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases.

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.11-12.1.D
    Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.11-12.1.E
    Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from or supports the argument presented.

    WHST.11-12.2. Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.

    1. Introduce a topic and organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
    2. Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.
    3. Use varied transitions and sentence structures to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.
    4. Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic; convey a knowledgeable stance in a style that responds to the discipline and context as well as to the expertise of likely readers.
    5. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation provided (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

    On the Spot

    For the Journalism Course, GCE Seniors investigated the guiding question:

    How do you write on the spot, with 500-700 words?

    Students were faced with the scenario:

    The GCE Herald, the student-led school newspaper is running a series of articles that feature news from the different neighborhoods represnted at GCE. Concerned with maintaining authenticty, the editors of the GCE Herald is putting out a call for submissions. They’re asking students to think and act as journalists to write a spot story about an event that took place in your neighborhood. The spot story must be between 500-700 words and must follow the outline of the inverted pyramid of journalism.

    Click on the notes and photos on the jounralist’s desk to see the students’ work.

    Alignment with Common Core ELA Standards

     
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.11-12.2.A
    Introduce a topic and organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.11-12.2.B
    Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.11-12.2.C
    Use varied transitions and sentence structures to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.11-12.2.E
    Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation provided (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

    W.5.5 With guidance and support from adults and peers, focus on a topic and strengthen writing as needed by revising and editing.

    L.6.2a. Use punctuation (commas, parentheses, dashes) to set off nonrestrictive/parenthetical elements.

    L.6.3a. Vary sentence patterns for meaning, reader/listener interest, and style.

    L.7.3a. Choose language that expresses ideas precisely and concisely, recognizing and eliminating wordiness and redundancy.

    L.8.1d. Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb voice and mood.

    WHST.11-12.0. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

    WHST.11-12.2. Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.

    a. Introduce a topic and organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. 

    b. Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic. 

    c. Use varied transitions and sentence structures to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts. 

    d. Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic; convey a knowledgeable stance in a style that responds to the discipline and context as well as to the expertise of likely readers. 

    e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation provided (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

    The Meaning of Life

    For the first Action Project in Journalism, GCE Seniors investigated the following guiding question:

    What’s the meaning of life… in 1000 words & 1 photo?

    Here’s the scenario students were challenged with:

    Right before the Holidays, in December 1988, LIFE Magazine published a special edition called “The Meaning of Life”; the editors asked “scientists and theologians, authors and artists, celebrities and everyday sages on the street” about their views on the meaning of life. They also invited “seven photographers who captured the meaning of life on a single frame of film”. These quotes are from the magazine.

    Now, in a new century, LIFE Magazine decided to recycle the project “The Meaning of Life — in 1000 words & 1 photo”. LIFE invited High School Senior students from all over the world to take on the role of a journalist to interview and photograph someone they believe to have an interesting/important/unique view of the meaning of life. The participants need to submit a single photo, together with a 1000 words-max text. The best submissions will be shared with the world on the LIFE legendary magazine.

    Please click on the photos in the gallery exhibit to open the featured student work.

    Alignment with Common Core ELA Standards

    ON RESEARCH & INTERVIEWING:

    SL.11-12.7. Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self- generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

    SL.11-12.1c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.

    ON MULTI-MEDIA (Photo-analysis):

    RH.11-12.7. Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.


    WHST.11-12.0. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

    WHST.11-12.2. Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.

    1. Introduce a topic and organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
    2. Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.
    3. Use varied transitions and sentence structures to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.
    4. Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic; convey a knowledgeable stance in a style that responds to the discipline and context as well as to the expertise of likely readers.
    5. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation provided (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

    The True Cost of College

    For the first Action Project in Economics, GCE Seniors investigated the following guiding question:

    How do you determine the value of your college education?

    Here’s the scenario students were challenged with:

    You are a high school senior and you are deciding whether to go to college, enroll in community college, or seek an internship next Fall. You are financing the entire cost of your education to pursue the career of your choice. You have heard that college has never been more expensive to attend. Between 2000 and 2010, the average cost of attending a private, 4-year institution has increased over 35%. However, your parents might think it’s worth it. The US Census Bureau data seems to agree, publishing a study that suggests college grads earn 74% more than those with a just a high school diploma. From your Economics class, you learned that over a lifetime that difference can mean more than a million dollar in forgone income.

    Your peers, family, teachers, and school administrators are excited to hear what you decide to do next year and why. In a 60 second video, explain your decision for next year and explanation. Your video is an executive summary. It must be accompanied by an in-depth analysis of your decision-making. Acceptable formats are 2-3 page paper or 5-15 slide power-point presentation.

    Click on the different career cards to take a closer look at the featured student works.

    National Standards: Project Alignment with Common Core Math & NextGen Standards

    CED.A.1 Create equations and inequalities in one variable and use them to solve problems. Include equations arising from linear and quadratic functions, and simple rational and exponential functions.

    CED.A.2: Create equations in two or more variables to represent relationships between quantities; graph equations on coordinate axes with labels and scales.

    REI.C.6: Solve systems of linear equations exactly and approximately (e.g., with graphs), focusing on pairs of linear equations in two variables.

    ID.C.7: Interpret the slope (rate of change) and the intercept (constant term) of a linear model in the context of the data.

    The Economics of College

    For the first Economics Action Project, GCE Senior students investigated the following guiding question:

    How do you determine the value of your college education?

    Here’s the scenario students were challenged with:

    You are a high school senior and you are deciding whether to go to college, enroll in community college, or seek an internship next Fall. You are financing the entire cost of your education to pursue the career of your choice. You have heard that college has never been more expensive to attend. Between 2000 and 2010, the average cost of attending a private, 4-year institution has increased over 35%. However, your parents might think it’s worth it. The US Census Bureau data seems to agree, publishing a study that suggests college grads earn 74% more than those with a just a high school diploma. From your Economics class, you learned that over a lifetime that difference can mean more than a million dollar in forgone income.

    Your peers, family, teachers, and school administrators are excited to hear what you decide to do next year and why. In a 60 second video, explain your decision for next year and explanation. Your video is an executive summary. It must be accompanied by an in-depth analysis of your decision-making. Acceptable formats are 2-3 page paper or 5-15 slide power-point presentation.

    Click on the piggy banks to take a closer look at the featured student works.

    National Standards: Project Alignment with Common Core Math & NextGen Standards

    CED.A.1 Create equations and inequalities in one variable and use them to solve problems. Include equations arising from linear and quadratic functions, and simple rational and exponential functions.

    CED.A.2: Create equations in two or more variables to represent relationships between quantities; graph equations on coordinate axes with labels and scales.

    REI.C.6: Solve systems of linear equations exactly and approximately (e.g., with graphs), focusing on pairs of linear equations in two variables.

    ID.C.7: Interpret the slope (rate of change) and the intercept (constant term) of a linear model in the context of the data.

    The Meanings of Life

    For the first Journalism Action Project, GCE Seniors investigated the following guiding question:

    What’s the meaning of life… in 1000 words & 1 photo?

    Here’s the scenario students were challenged with:

    Right before the Holidays, in December 1988, LIFE Magazine published a special edition called “The Meaning of Life”; the editors asked “scientists and theologians, authors and artists, celebrities and everyday sages on the street” about their views on the meaning of life. They also invited “seven photographers who captured the meaning of life on a single frame of film”. These quotes are from the magazine.

    Now, in a new century, LIFE Magazine decided to recycle the project “The Meaning of Life — in 1000 words & 1 photo”. LIFE invited High School Senior students from all over the world to take on the role of a journalist to interview and photograph someone they believe to have an interesting/important/unique view of the meaning of life. The participants need to submit a single photo, together with a 1000 words-max text. The best submissions will be shared with the world on the LIFE legendary magazine.

    Please click on the images in the magazine spread to open the featured student work.

    Alignment with Common Core ELA Standards

    ON RESEARCH & INTERVIEWING:

    SL.11-12.7. Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self- generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

    SL.11-12.1c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.

    ON MULTI-MEDIA (Photo-analysis):

    RH.11-12.7. Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.


    WHST.11-12.0. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

    WHST.11-12.2. Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.

    1. Introduce a topic and organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
    2. Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.
    3. Use varied transitions and sentence structures to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.
    4. Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic; convey a knowledgeable stance in a style that responds to the discipline and context as well as to the expertise of likely readers.
    5. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation provided (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).
    Systems & Models: An integrated, project-based high school class

    Systems & Models

    To what extent are you unique as an individual, and how do you function within the larger framework of an organization such as your school, place of worship, or job? In Systems and Models, you will explore breakthroughs in psychology; you will use the scientific method to design and carry out your own experiment; and ideally, you will conclude the course knowing how to be of greater value to yourself and others.

    Entrepreneurship: An integrated, project-based high school class

    Social Entrepreneurship

    Prerequisite understanding of economics and systems thinking serves as the foundation to envision and plan a business venture which you may passionately and realistically pursue. Fueling your inspiration are weekly workshops with successful entrepreneurs. The course guides you through core concepts of entrepreneurship, and then demands that you write and pitch your own business plan.

    Economics: An integrated, project-based high school class

    Econ: Risking Value

    We live in a world of limited resources, but our wants and needs are unlimited. Amid scarcity, choices are made. In this course, you will explore the value of a college education and plan your financial future using principles of economics and personal finance, statistics, and probability. You will read case studies and visit financial institutions to learn how economists apply models to solve real-world problems from the financial crisis to poverty reduction.

    Equality: An integrated, project-based high school class

    Equality

    “All men are born equal”. But, what about women? And, even if we are born equal, do we live in equality? How do wealth and resources fit in? In this course, you will explore inequalities that exist based upon gender, race, and socioeconomic class differences. You will become familiar with the theories that strive to explain why these inequalities exist, whom they oppress and benefit, what actions have been taken in the past, and what can be done now to dismantle the systems and institutions that perpetuate them. You will gain the knowledge necessary to engage in these debates, develop skills to facilitate meaningful dialogues, and access the tools necessary to mediate disputes and impact change.

    Endurance: An integrated, project-based high school class

    Endurance

    How much are you willing to endure to change the world? This course will ask you to face your challenges, and learn endurance through endurance. The content of this course will be felt: you will endure the course not because it is boring, but because it poses real-life challenges. The ultimate resource for this course lies in your own 5 senses; they will all be challenged through Sense Solos, which will help you dive deeper into who you are and how much you are willing to endure to change the world.

    Journalism: An integrated, project-based high school class

    Journalism

    How do you know about the world? In this course, you will learn how to observe, analyze and report on current events through different media—Image, Sound and Text. In each of these three units, you will be challenged to conduct an exploration into a realm of journalism; you will follow a full cycle of investigation; meet with specialists in the area; and conclude each investigation with an Action Project that reports the news in a multimedia format.

    equality

    Declaration of Rights- An Equality Online Installation

    For the Equality Course, GCE Seniors investigated the following guiding question:

    How may we all claim the same rights?

    Here’s the scenario students were challenged with:

    “There is a time when the operation of the machine becomes so odious, makes you so sick at heart, that you can’t take part; you can’t even passively take part, and you’ve got to put your bodies upon the gears and upon the wheels, upon the levers, upon all the apparatus, and you’ve got to make it stop. And you’ve got to indicate to the people who run it, to the people who own it, that unless you’re free, the machine will be prevented from working at all!”

    Mario Savio, one of the leaders of the Free Speech Movement at the University of California, Berkeley delivered these iconic words on December 2, 1964 in response to the University’s attempts to withhold the students’ right to protest. Savio inspired his peers then, and generations after his to stand up against the powers that oppress. Today, “the machine” continues to serve its citizens unequally and it is up to you to inspire your peers into action.

    Using your knowledge of the different theories of citizenship, your analysis and research on a specific violation of rights, and your examination of The United Nation’s Declaration of Universal Human Rights and the United States Bill of Rights, you will write a contemporary Declaration of Rights and facilitate a conversation based on the preamble and the articles you composed.

    Please click on the preamble and the articles on the Declaration below to see what rights the students declare for all citizens.

    Alignment with Common Core Standards

    History and Social Studies Standards

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.1 : Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.2 : Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.3: Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.

    Writing Standards

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.1.A: Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.1.B: Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases.

    Reading Standards for Informational Text

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

    Speaking and Listening Standards

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.1.A: Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.1.C: Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.1.D: Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.2: Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) in order to make informed decisions and solve problems, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source and noting any discrepancies among the data.

    The Meanings of Life – a Journalism Online Installation

    For the first Journalism Action Project, GCE Seniors investigated the following guiding question:

    What’s the meaning of life… in 1000 words & 1 photo?

    Here’s the scenario students were challenged with:

    Right before the Holidays, in December 1988, LIFE Magazine published a special edition called “The Meaning of Life”; the editors asked “scientists and theologians, authors and artists, celebrities and everyday sages on the street” about their views on the meaning of life. They also invited “seven photographers who captured the meaning of life on a single frame of film”. These quotes are from the magazine.

    Now, in a new century, LIFE Magazine decided to recycle the project “The Meaning of Life — in 1000 words & 1 photo”.  LIFE invited High School Senior students from all over the world to take on the role of a journalist to interview and photograph someone they believe to have an interesting/important/unique view of the meaning of life. The participants need to submit a single photo, together with a 1000 words-max text.  The best submissions will be shared with the world on the LIFE legendary magazine.

    Please find below the online installation we created, featuring the different meanings of life explored by GCE Seniors. Please click on the links to open the full profiles & pictures by each student.

     

    Alignment with Common Core ELA Standards

     

    ON RESEARCH & INTERVIEWING:

    SL.11-12.7. Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self- generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

    SL.7.1c. Pose questions that elicit elaboration and respond to others’ questions and comments with relevant observations and ideas that bring the discussion back on topic as needed.

    SL.11-12.1c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.

    ON MULTI-MEDIA (Photo-analysis):

    RH.11-12.7. Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

    SL.8.5. Integrate multimedia and visual displays into presentations to clarify information, strengthen claims and evidence, and add interest.

    ON LANGUAGE & WRITING:

    W.5.5 With guidance and support from adults and peers, focus on a topic and strengthen writing as needed by revising and editing.

    L.6.2a. Use punctuation (commas, parentheses, dashes) to set off nonrestrictive/parenthetical elements.

    L.6.3a. Vary sentence patterns for meaning, reader/listener interest, and style.

    L.7.3a. Choose language that expresses ideas precisely and concisely, recognizing and eliminating wordiness and redundancy.

    L.8.1d. Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb voice and mood.

    WHST.11-12.0. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

    WHST.11-12.2. Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.

    a. Introduce a topic and organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. 

    b. Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic. 

    c. Use varied transitions and sentence structures to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts. 

    d. Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic; convey a knowledgeable stance in a style that responds to the discipline and context as well as to the expertise of likely readers. 

    e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation provided (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

    Protesting Censorship – An Equality Online Installation

    For the third Equality Action Project, GCE Seniors investigated the following guiding question:

    How do people approach censorship? 

    Here’s the scenario students were challenged with:

    The Museum of Contemporary Arts (MCA) is paying homage to past artists whose works were considered politically and culturally unacceptable to display. The MCA is sponsoring a youth exhibit, featuring artworks that address current inequalities in the distribution of information and the freedom of expression. You will submit a piece of artwork that mimics the propaganda-style of past artists that serves as a call-to-action to a current issue. Be prepared to facilitate a conversation about your artwork.

    Please find below the online installation we created, featuring the propaganda posters the students created to address censorship. Please click on the posters to read the artist statement for each poster.