Course Poster

ReDesigning the Future

How can we design our future?

Why?

The purpose of this project is to understand the grand challenges we must overcome to achieve sustainability, and to use design thinking to address those challenges.

How?

Here are the unit sub guiding questions you will pursue:

  • What is the future of our planet?
  • How doe we slow climate change?
  • How do systems interact?
  • How does systems thinking impact design and engineering?
Course Poster

Drawing Lines

How does public art create place?
What is the geography of public art?
How and where does public art happen?

Drawing Lines is an Art History Elective that investigates public artworks as a tool for placemaking. What purposes does public art serve? How may art transform public spaces and people’s interaction with them? Who and what decides where public art belongs? How do materials reflect a community’s needs or an artist’s intention? What purpose will your art serve in a community?

In this course, you will explore the history of public art by examining specific public art movements throughout history. Art in public spaces has the power to share stories, educate, unite communities, and impact change on a large scale. This course invites you to examine the purposes and politics behind public art so that you can create your own piece of work that has an impact on the greater community.

Course Poster

All the World’s A Stage

How can drama be used to highlight oppression?

Why?

All The World’s A Stage is a combined STEAM/Humanities course that focuses on the “how” of theatrical productions and the “why” of the use of dramatic dialogue.

How?

  • Students will investigate the characteristics, purposes, and function of the dramatic monologue.
  • Students will develop an independent monologue that functions within a group of monologues to give voice to an oppressed voice.
  • Students will perform their monologues in a public space.

Like A Fungus

For the first Biomimicry Action Project, GCE students investigated the following guiding question:

How would a fungus…?

Here’s the scenario students were challenged with:

You are a product designer for a company who has taken inspiration from Ray Anderson and is in the process of implementing your own “Mission Zero” business model. According to Anderson,

Mission Zero…is our promise to eliminate any negative impact our company may have on the environment by the year 2020… Every creative, manufacturing and building decision we make is intended to help us achieve zero environmental footprints by 2020 and give you the most fashionable, high performing and environmentally well-rounded products in the industry.

Your job is to choose one product from your company’s design portfolio and redesign it, using biomimicry to improve its design, energy consumption, and ecological footprint. Your design will be used as a model for the rest of your firm to transition all products to abide by the Mission Zero model.

Click on the products in the sketch to see the featured designs.

Alignment with Common Core Math & NextGen Standards

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.9-10.7
Translate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text into visual form (e.g., a table or chart) and translate information expressed visually or mathematically (e.g., in an equation) into words.

LS4.C: ADAPTATION
How does the environment influence populations of organisms over multiple generations?

LS4.D: BIODIVERSITY AND HUMANS
What is biodiversity, how do humans affect it, and how does it affect humans?

MS-ETS1-1.
Define the criteria and constraints of a design problem with sufficient precision to ensure a successful solution, taking into account relevant scientific principles and potential impacts on people and the natural environment that may limit possible solutions.

CROSSCUTTING CONCEPTS:
1. Patterns. Observed patterns of forms and events guide organization and classification, and they prompt questions about relationships and the factors that influence them.

6. Structure and function. The way in which an object or living thing is shaped and its substructure determine many of its properties and functions.

Changing the Game

For the final Action Project in Game Changers, GCE students investigated the following guiding question:

 

What game will you create?

Here’s the scenario students were challenged with:

You are a game designer. You have created a game, from concept to packaging. You have gone through rounds of playtesting to make improvements. As a final push for your game, you will create a video to send to investors and game producers. This video will show off your prototype as well as demonstrate how the game is played so they can better make their decision of whether or not to invest.

Click on the videos to the right to see the students’ games.

Alignment with Common Core Math & English Standards

Use probability to evaluate outcomes of decisions

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSS.MD.B.5 Weigh the possible outcomes of a decision by assigning probabilities to payoff values and finding expected values.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSS.MD.B.5.A Find the expected payoff for a game of chance. For example, find the expected winnings from a state lottery ticket or a game at a fast-food restaurant.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSS.MD.B.5.B Evaluate and compare strategies on the basis of expected values. For example, compare a high-deductible versus a low-deductible automobile insurance policy using various, but reasonable, chances of having a minor or a major accident.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSS.MD.B.6 Use probabilities to make fair decisions (e.g., drawing by lots, using a random number generator).

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSS.MD.B.7 Analyze decisions and strategies using probability concepts (e.g., product testing, medical testing, pulling a hockey goalie at the end of a game).

Understand and evaluate random processes underlying statistical experiments.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSS.IC.A.2 Decide if a specified model is consistent with results from a given data-generating process, e.g., using simulation. For example, a model says a spinning coin falls heads up with probability 0.5. Would a result of 5 tails in a row cause you to question the model?

Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.5 Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

Alignment with National Core Arts Standards

Conceiving and developing new artistic ideas and work.

Anchor Standard #1. Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work.
Anchor Standard #2. Organize and develop artistic ideas and work.
Anchor Standard #3. Refine and complete artistic work.

Critiquing Pre-Production

For the Ollywood Elective Course, GCE students investigated the following guiding question:

How can we critique the elements of film pre-production?

Here’s the scenario students were challenged with:

You have been invited to contribute a movie critique to RogerEbert.com. For this round of submissions, the editors are requesting critiques that focus specifically on elements of film pre-production including analysis of the screenplay, character development, location, and set and costume design.

Click on the movie tickets to read the featured critiques.

Alignment with Common Core Standards

Writing Standards

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.2.A. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.2.B. Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.7 Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating the understanding of the subject under investigation.

Like A Plant

For the first Biomimicry Action Project, GCE students investigated the following guiding question:

How would a plant…?

Here’s the scenario students were challenged with:

You are working for a biomimicry design firm, and are in the early stages of research for a new product. You will be presenting your research to your board of directors, and they would like to know about plants and what we can learn from them.

First, identify a plant species that intrigues you, then create a presentation to present to the board that includes the species’ unique adaptations to its environment, and how that information can be applied to human design.

Click on the plants sketch to see the featured designs.

Alignment with Common Core Math & NextGen Standards

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.9-10.7
Translate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text into visual form (e.g., a table or chart) and translate information expressed visually or mathematically (e.g., in an equation) into words.

LS4.C: ADAPTATION
How does the environment influence populations of organisms over multiple generations?

LS4.D: BIODIVERSITY AND HUMANS
What is biodiversity, how do humans affect it, and how does it affect humans?

MS-ETS1-1.
Define the criteria and constraints of a design problem with sufficient precision to ensure a successful solution, taking into account relevant scientific principles and potential impacts on people and the natural environment that may limit possible solutions.

CROSSCUTTING CONCEPTS:
1. Patterns. Observed patterns of forms and events guide organization and classification, and they prompt questions about relationships and the factors that influence them.

6. Structure and function. The way in which an object or living thing is shaped and its substructure determine many of its properties and functions.

Game Changers

How can you harness the power of play?

The experience of playing games is universal across ages, spaces, and time. Games can consist of complicated pieces, books, and tables or could be as simple as using your own hands to do the playing. The advancement of technology has allowed video games to come into play in the past 50 years, as well.

In this course, you are invited to a ‘behind the scenes’ look at tabletop games. How do you play and how do you play your best? After a closer look at the playing process, you will try your hand at game design with the ultimate goal of creating your own game from scratch.

Rocket Science Poster

Rocket Science

Throughout history, humans have been experimenting with pushing our own boundaries. Although the discovery of explosive propulsion gave us a physical boost, the momentum for exploring new frontiers was already in full effect. Over the next term, you will explore the history of rocketry and propulsion, build mathematical models to demonstrate the behavior of bodies in flight, determine content and means of meaningful communication, and then ultimately design, build, and launch a rocket of your own. At the end of the term, you will combine all of your findings into one comprehensive set of results for future studies.

Along the way, you will partake in Mini-Missions; think of these as checkpoints along the way. Not only will they be a place to check for understanding of key concepts, but you will also be able to earn ‘patches’ that will adorn your rocket on launch day for a job well done. You may also use the Mini-Missions to shore up any missing parts with your peers’ and instructor’s assistance. If you need help, you have plenty of resources. We are a team.

One last feature of this course is the inclusion of micro-biographies. Each individual is a pioneer in the individual field and contributed to the lasting history of STEAM studies. The biographies are short and are intended as teasers; there is a further studies list at the end of the course.

Poetic Justice

Poetic Justice

How can you become a poet of social change?

If more politicians knew poetry, and more poets knew politics, I am convinced the world would be a little better place in which to live. —U.S. President John F. Kennedy.

Poetic Justice asks you to explore the relationship between art and politics, uncover the history of protest poetry, and understand its status and evolution within today’s political climate. The course begins with an introduction to two basic concepts – poetry and politics. We will discuss the differences between poetry and the other literary arts as we attempt to identify the unique qualities that make verse such a powerful medium for political expression. Along the way, we will read, hear, watch, and analyze political poetry from the past and present moments as we prepare to write and perform our very own protest poems. How will you use poetry to fight the power?

Students of Poetic Justice will pursue these Guiding Questions:

  • What makes poetry radical?
  • Where does poetry fight for freedom?
  • How will you protest with poetry?

Picturing Yourself

For the Systems & Models Course, GCE Seniors investigated the following guiding question:

How do you picture yourself?

Here’s the scenario students were challenged with:

The purpose of this Action Project is to synthesize all of the information that you’ve learned about yourself through the range of profile activities and create an artistic rendering of yourself. What you create may or may not look like you, or even a human being; and this is acceptable because you will explain your self-rendering through an artist statement that is anchored in the language and understandings gleaned from the individual profiles experienced in U1 Internal Investigation. 

Click on the sketches in the sketchbook to take a closer look at the students’ self-portraits.

National Standards: Project Alignment with Common Core Standards:

Text Types and Purposes:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.3.B. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.3.C. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.3.D. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.3.E. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

Comprehension and Collaboration:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.1.A. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.

Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.4. Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.5 Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

Illinois Learning Standards for Social Science: Psychology Standards

SS.Psy.3.9-12 Understand a variety of psychological perspectives and apply their concepts and theoretical ideas to the investigation of similarities and differences in behavior and mental processes.

SS.Psy.4.9-12 Analyze how biological, psychological, and sociocultural factors and their interactions influence individuals’ behavior and mental processes.

SS.Psy.7.9-12 Apply psychological knowledge to their daily lives.

SS.Psy.8.9-12 Use appropriate psychological terminology with reference to psychologists, their experiments, and theories in order to explain the possible causes of and impact on behavior and mental processes.

Video Movie Critiques

For the Ollywood Elective Course, GCE students investigated the following guiding question:

How can you critique the elements of film production?

Here’s the scenario students were challenged with:

“At the Movies was Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert’s movie review television show. Siskel and Ebert reviewed soon-to-be-releasesd movies and were known for their sharp criticism and more famously, for their banter on screen. Their trademark “thumbs up” and “thumbs down” rating and their style of criticism have forever impacted the way that movies are reviewed today. 

To commemorate the work of Siskel and Ebert, your local television network is featuring local movie critics on their evening news. Applicants must submit an audition tape that shows their knowledge as movie critics and their talent as television stars. For the audition tape, you must critique a movie for elements of pre-production, production, and post-production. In addition to critiquing those elements of the film, you must utilize those elements in the production of the video.   

Click on the TVs to see the students’ audition tapes.

National Standards: Project Alignment with Common Core Standards:

Text Types and Purposes:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.3.B. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.3.C. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.3.D. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.3.E. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

Comprehension and Collaboration:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.1.A. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.

Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.4. Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.5 Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

Designing a Game

For the second Action Project in Game Changers, GCE students investigated the following guiding question:

 

What game will you create?

Here’s the scenario students were challenged with:

You are a game designer. You have created a game, from concept to packaging. You have gone through rounds of playtesting to make improvements. As a final push for your game, you will create a video to send to investors and game producers. This video will show off your prototype as well as demonstrate how the game is played so they can better make their decision of whether or not to invest.

Alignment with Common Core Math & English Standards

Use probability to evaluate outcomes of decisions

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSS.MD.B.5 Weigh the possible outcomes of a decision by assigning probabilities to payoff values and finding expected values.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSS.MD.B.5.A Find the expected payoff for a game of chance. For example, find the expected winnings from a state lottery ticket or a game at a fast-food restaurant.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSS.MD.B.5.B Evaluate and compare strategies on the basis of expected values. For example, compare a high-deductible versus a low-deductible automobile insurance policy using various, but reasonable, chances of having a minor or a major accident.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSS.MD.B.6 Use probabilities to make fair decisions (e.g., drawing by lots, using a random number generator).

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSS.MD.B.7 Analyze decisions and strategies using probability concepts (e.g., product testing, medical testing, pulling a hockey goalie at the end of a game).

Understand and evaluate random processes underlying statistical experiments.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSS.IC.A.2 Decide if a specified model is consistent with results from a given data-generating process, e.g., using simulation. For example, a model says a spinning coin falls heads up with probability 0.5. Would a result of 5 tails in a row cause you to question the model?

Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.5 Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

Alignment with National Core Arts Standards

Conceiving and developing new artistic ideas and work.

Anchor Standard #1. Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work.
Anchor Standard #2. Organize and develop artistic ideas and work.
Anchor Standard #3. Refine and complete artistic work.

Composing a Hit

For the second Action Project in Radio-rithmetic, GCE students investigated the following guiding question:

 

How do you compose a hit?

Here’s the scenario students were challenged with:

A record company is promoting a mashup contest wherein students from across the country combine elements from existing songs with their own original content to make modern musical collages. Your goal is to take everything you have learned in this course, put it into your own creation, and make it sound good!

Click on the songs in the playlist to hear the hits the students composed.

Alignment with Common Core Math & English Standards

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSA.SSE.A.1: Interpret expressions that represent a quantity in terms of its context.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSA.SSE.A.1.A: Interpret parts of an expression, such as terms, factors, and coefficients.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.5 Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

Alignment with National Core Arts Standards

Conceiving and developing new artistic ideas and work.

Anchor Standard #1. Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work.
Anchor Standard #2. Organize and develop artistic ideas and work.
Anchor Standard #3. Refine and complete artistic work.

Performing (dance, music, theatre): Realizing artistic ideas and work through interpretation and presentation. Presenting (visual arts): Interpreting and sharing artistic work. Producing (media arts): Realizing and presenting artistic ideas and work.

Anchor Standard #4. Analyze, interpret, and select artistic work for presentation.
Anchor Standard #5. Develop and refine artistic work for presentation.
Anchor Standard #6. Convey meaning through the presentation of artistic work.

Analyzing a Song

For the first Action Project in Radio-rithmetic, GCE students investigated the following guiding question:

Why do you love this beat?

Here’s the scenario students were challenged with:

You are lucky enough to get an internship combining your personal and professional passions – working for an upstart recording label. You are tasked with finding their next big hit. You have a song in mind, but your bosses are looking for something more objective – they want numerical data proving why they should invest in this song.

Your job is to make a video of you analyzing the song of your choosing, and “sell it” using the mathematical concepts from the internal and external investigations.

Click on the different artists in the Fibonacci spiral to take a look at the students’ song analyses.

Alignment with Common Core Math & English Standards

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSA.SSE.A.1: Interpret expressions that represent a quantity in terms of its context.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSA.SSE.A.1.A: Interpret parts of an expression, such as terms, factors, and coefficients.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSA.REI.A.1: Explain each step in solving a simple equation as following from the equality of numbers asserted at the previous step, starting from the assumption that the original equation has a solution. Construct a viable argument to justify a solution method.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.HSA.REI.D.10: Understand that the graph of an equation in two variables is the set of all its solutions plotted in the coordinate plane, often forming a curve (which could be a line).

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.4: Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.5 Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

Stage 1- Fine Arts- Music 25A: Students who meet the standard understand the sensory elements, organizational principles, and expressive qualities of the arts.

Like A Plant

For the first Biomimicry 101 Action Project, GCE students investigated the following guiding question:

How would a plant…?

Here’s the scenario students were challenged with:

You are working for a biomimicry design firm, and are in the early stages of research for a new product. You will be presenting your research to your board of directors, and they would like to know about plants and what we can learn from them.

First, identify a plant species that intrigues you, then create a presentation to present to the board that includes the species’ unique adaptations to its environment, and how that information can be applied to human design.

Please click on the plants in the landscape to open the featured student works.

Alignment with Common Core Math & NextGen Standards

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.9-10.7
Translate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text into visual form (e.g., a table or chart) and translate information expressed visually or mathematically (e.g., in an equation) into words.

LS4.C: ADAPTATION
How does the environment influence populations of organisms over multiple generations?

LS4.D: BIODIVERSITY AND HUMANS
What is biodiversity, how do humans affect it, and how does it affect humans?

MS-ETS1-1.
Define the criteria and constraints of a design problem with sufficient precision to ensure a successful solution, taking into account relevant scientific principles and potential impacts on people and the natural environment that may limit possible solutions.

CROSSCUTTING CONCEPTS:
1. Patterns. Observed patterns of forms and events guide organization and classification, and they prompt questions about relationships and the factors that influence them.

6. Structure and function. The way in which an object or living thing is shaped and its substructure determine many of its properties and functions.

Life Imitates Art

For the first If These Walls Could Talk Action Project, GCE students investigated the following guiding question:

What image would you create to address a neighborhood’s needs?

Here’s the scenario students were challenged with:

The city you live in is hosting a contest for students to sketch an image that could be used to create a large-scale mural. Groups of Aldermen across the city have gathered and have identified the need for murals in their neighborhoods. It is up to you to visit and research a neighborhood to identify its needs. Use the story-telling and artistic techniques from the murals we’ve studied in this unit to create a sketch for your chosen neighborhood. You will also write an artist statement that defends how your image addresses the neighborhood’s needs and how it utilizes elements from the murals we’ve studied.

Please click on the Instagram photos to open the featured student works.

Alignment with Common Core Standards & Illinois Learning Standards for Fine Arts

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.7: IIntegrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.9: Integrate information from diverse sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.9-10.2: Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.9-10.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

27B: Students who meet the standard understand how the arts shape and reflect history, society and everyday life.

  1. Analyze the impact of political actions, current events, and natural phenomena (e.g., wars, civil unrest, disasters, economic prosperity, discovery, technology, legislation) on the development and production of art.
  2. Cite examples of where the arts shaped aspects of a culture (e.g., Dionysian theatre festival, Renaissance church art and music, cinema and the Depression).
  3. Analyze how historical and cultural contexts influence arts processes and products (e.g., Reformation, patronage system, invention of microphone, camera, and printing press, WPA).
Stage Chemistry

Stage Chemistry, Goodman Theatre’s STEM-based Education Initiative

How does learning the production process of theater change your perception and experience of the world? How does the narrative power of story come to life in theater? How can you replicate a multi-million dollar theater in your backyard, school, or anywhere else that you choose? In this course, you will look at the theater from the perspective of an architect, stage manager, and set designer in order to apply math and physics to draw out the magic on stage.

Five Faces of Genius

Five Faces of Genius

How do you live a more creative life?
How do you understand and access your genius? How do you find your place in the world, and love it? How do you make the world better as you manifest your creative genius?

This course explores the beauty and challenges of life through the examination of personal creativity and how it can impact you and your communities. The Five Faces of Genius™ frames your investigation into learning specific skills and techniques through the challenges faced in families, communities and the world, which are bigger and more difficult than ever before. This course will provide practical skills and tools, but it does so in the context of thoughtful consideration on creativity, problem-solving and teamwork.

Ollywood

Ollywood

What makes a movie a movie? How is storytelling through film different from storytelling through literature? Which films deserve a “thumbs-up” and which deserve a “thumbs-down” – and why? These are just some of the questions you will pursue in the Ollywood course. By investigating the stages of pre-production, production and post-production, you will develop a critical eye for film and TV, and express your critiques in written, video, and audio formats.