Senior / Humanities / Global Vision

How do you know about the world? In this course, you will learn how to observe, analyze and report on current events through different media—Image, Sound and Text. In each of these three units, you will be challenged to conduct an exploration into a realm of journalism; you will follow a full cycle of investigation; meet with specialists in the area; and conclude each investigation with an Action Project that reports the news in a multimedia format.

Course Units

  • How does photojournalism help you see the world?

    “An image is worth a thousand words”. This is a saying that became a cliché; one of the goals of this first unit in Journalism is to ask, “how does photojournalism help you see the world?”

    In the first unit of this Journalism course, you will take on the role of a photojournalist, practicing both the essential skills of photography and the critical thinking behind the composition of images that daily shape the way we see the world.

    After practicing the essential skills and concepts of photojournalism, you will interview and photograph a person you believe has an unique/interesting/important view of the meaning of life. In the Action Project, you will select your best picture of your interviewee and write a 1000-word essay to accompany your photo.

    Here are some guiding questions you will pursue:

    • What are the essential skills, values and concepts of photojournalism?
    • How do you lend voice and eyes to your interviewee?
    • What is the meaning of life, in 1 photo and 1000 words?
  • How does radio let you hear the world?

    We have an emotional reaction to music, to sounds, to voices. When we fall asleep, hearing is the last of the 5 senses to shut down. When we hear a song we like, sometimes we remember the exact moment when we heard it for the first time.

    In the second Journalism unit, you will investigate why and how radio has been used to connect us to here and now, with an average frequency of 10^6 Hertz.

    In this unit, you will take on the role of a radio-journalist, practicing both the essential skills of interviewing, as well as script-writing and sound-editing.

    After practicing essential skills and concepts of radio-journalism, you will produce a story to tell a mini-biography of a voice important to the 21st century. For this Action Project, you will need to search for a story, collect interviews, record karaoke and edit soundbites. You will present the result as a podcast piece to be shared with the world.

    Here are some guiding questions you will pursue:

    • What are the essential skills, values and concepts of radio-journalism?
    • How do you produce a radio story?
    • What’s the story of a voice, in 3 to 5min?
  • How do you read the world?

    We notice the headlines. They grab our attention because they are big, and because they are made to grab our attention. Someone thought about them, choosing the precise words to create a precise effect. Fifty-five (55) characters is the average size of headlines in the New York Times; 55 conscious decisions.

    In the third Journalism unit, you will investigate why & how written journalism has been used to connect us to here & now, both with printed and virtual words. You will take on the role of a text-journalist, practicing both the essential skills of observation, as well as precise & diverse writing. You will also present a study of the journalistic book you chose to read at the beginning of this course.

    After practicing skills & concepts of text-based journalism, you will attend & cover an event to create a journalistic spot piece, with 500 to 700 words.

    Here are some guiding questions you will pursue:

    • What are the essential skills, values & concepts of written journalism in the 21st century?
    • How do you produce a written journalistic text?
    • What can you write on the spot, with 500-700 words